The Gallery is Back

After receiving dozens of emails from friends that said they couldn’t access my photo gallery anymore, I managed to pull an all-nighter and recode everything. It’s back up, with a new look.

Actually, my sister-in-law told me over dinner that she couldn’t find any pictures of the kids and I had to fix one line of code to get to the new gallery. But I know you all wanted to tell me it wasn’t working…

Totally Cool New Photo Viewing!

I just learned about a new application/plugin that people can use for a real snazzy way to present photo galleries. It’s called Cooliris (formerly it was PicLens). Products like Cooliris are so cool that it’s frustrating to know that hardly anyone uses them. You have to check it.

So what does Cooliris do? It takes certains compatible websites and allows the user to view the website/media in a really slick and attractive interface. I think of it kind of like turning your boring browser screen into a cool iPhone type experience. Using it is very easy. Just browse to http://www.cooliris.com/ and click on the green download button. This will install Cooliris on the browser that you are using. If you use multiple browsers, such as internet explorer and Firefox, you need to repeat this download for each one. Once it is installed and you’ve restarted the browser, you’re ready to rock. You should see the blue/green Cooliris box on your browser now, like in the picture below.
Cooliris icon

Now all you have to do is browse to a website/webpage that is compatible with Cooliris. Here is a list of supported sites for Cooliris. You’ll see that it includes a lot of popular photo websites such as Flickr, Facebook, Picasa, Zooomr, etc. Next time you visit your friends pictures on line, check out Cooliris.

Check out our family photo album -> Browse to it, click the Cooliris button and have at ‘er!

Tagging Photos

I’m a big fan of tagging photos once they are downloaded to the PC. Proper data management of digital media is critical for efficient use. In other words, if you don’t properly manage your photos, music and videos, you likely will hardly ever view or listen to them.

Two pieces of software I’m using right now with good success are iTag and Geosetter. Each program serves pretty much only one purpose, and as such they are good and simple at what they do. Plus they are both free.

As you would guess, iTag offers a simple interface for tagging multiple photos at once. I’ve tried a lot of different tagging software for photos and most of them aren’t that great for tagging multiple photos at one time. iTag doesn’t do as many things as other software does, but it does this particular thing quite well.

I use Geosetter for geotagging photos. For many of the photos I have now, I place geotags on them. This means that the photos contain geographical data locating them by latitude/longitude coordinates. Lots of different programs can read this data and place the photos on the map, programs such as google maps, yahoo maps, etc.

10 more Nepal photos added

Follow the portals, starting from the picture in this post about my Nepal photos.

Uploading photos from my trekking in Nepal

I’m doing a bit of experiment. I’m scanning my photos from trekking in Nepal and uploading them to my zooomr photo sharing account. Each of these photos will have a “portal” in it. A portal is a “picture within a picture” concept. When you hover your mouse over a photo a small box will appear with photo inside it. Clicking on this box will take you to the next photo, and so on. So far I’ve only scanned maybe 1/4 or 1/10 of the photos I’ll upload. But if you want to see the start, go here:

Kathmandu

In case I get lucky and one of my companions from this trip google their own names, I’ll list them here and maybe they’ll contact me. As best as I can recall, I trekked with: Scott Haddad, John McKone, Mark McPhail, John Taylor, Michael Lansten, Chris Arts, Tomer Peled, and Beto.

New photoblog is online and ready

I’ve been messing around with putting together a photoblog for a while now. I’ve pretty much finished what I wanted to put together, so feel free to check out AlpineVisions at your leisure. Let me know what you think of the layout, and leave comments on the photos if you have something trivial to say.

As for the layout of the photoblog, it was made with WordPress (same as this website) with the help of the K2 theme, modified by Kristin Pishdadi. All of the files in the photoblog are hosted on Zooomr.

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